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Lawrenceville Weather

Weather for Gwinnett County, Georgia

Lat: 33.96N, Lon: 84.03W
Wx Zone: GAZ034 CWA Used: FFC

Georgia Drought Monitor

The Georgia Drought monitor is a subset of the United States Monitor, issued every Thursday morning, based on drought conditions the previous Tuesday. The map below shows the current drought level around the state, and the percent of Georgia land area in each drought level compared to the previous week.

Read an explanation of the drought intensities and what they mean.

Georgia Drought Monitor

Georgia Hydrologic Information Statement

Note that if drought conditions are not being experienced, or in the case of river flooding or heavy rain, this statement may be used to indicate river flows or flood potential.

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Hydrologic Outlook
National Weather Service Peachtree City GA
1253 PM EST Thu Mar 2 2017

...FLOOD RISK IS BELOW NORMAL FOR NORTH AND CENTRAL GEORGIA...

For the spring of 2017, the Southeast River Forecast Center is 
calling for a below normal river flood potential for north and 
central Georgia. Given that spring is a characteristically active 
period for river flooding, this outlook indicates that north and 
central Georgia can expect to see the number and magnitude of river 
floods to be lower than typical. 

CURRENT HYDROLOGIC CONDITIONS...

SOIL MOISTURE.
Recent shallow soil moisture conditions fall into the slightly dry 
to favorably wet category across the state due to recent rainfall. 
Although the deep moisture profile is near normal across a large 
majority of the state, north Georgia still falls into the severe to 
extreme drought categories. Average daily stream flows for the past 
30 days have been running below to much below normal, particularly 
across north Georgia, where some locations in the headwaters of the 
Chattahoochee River basin have observed record low flows.  

CLIMATE REGIME.
Following a quiet regime late last fall, the winter pattern has been 
relatively active, with weather systems impacting north and central 
Georgia every three to five days. Significant rainfall events have 
averaged every two to three weeks.  

RAINFALL.
During the past 90 days, below normal precipitation has occurred 
over north Georgia, and above normal precipitation over central 
Georgia. In general, areas north of a line from Carrollton, to 
Madison, to Washington have received 50 to 90 percent of normal 
precipitation with rainfall totals of 8 to 15 inches. South of this 
line, rainfall amounts of 15 to 25 inches (or 110 to 200 percent of 
normal) has occurred. 

RECENT FLOODING.
Although flooding was not an issue through the month of February, 
several heavy rainfall events produced minor river flooding in 
January, largely in portions of the Ocmulgee, Oconee and Flint River 
basins. Localized flash flooding occurred in portions of west central 
Georgia.

RESERVOIR CONSIDERATIONS.
Overall pool levels of the major reservoirs in north and central 
Georgia are running below winter pool levels. A few exceptions, 
including Allatoona and West Point, are running near target for this 
time of year as they begin letting the pools rise to summer pool 
levels. With generally low pool levels, most reservoirs should be 
able to assist with flood mitigation through the spring months as 
heavy rain events occur. 

DROUGHT AREAS.
Severe to extreme drought conditions persist across north Georgia, 
generally north of a line from Carrollton, to Lilburn, to Elberton, 
with the most dry conditions across the northernmost two tiers of 
counties. The drought has recently ended across central Georgia. For 
additional information, please see our Drought Information 
Statements.

HYDROMETEOROLOGICAL OUTLOOKS... 

METEOROLOGICAL OUTLOOK.
The southeast U.S. is expected to be in a neutral pattern through 
the spring, with the CPC outlook keeping equal chances of above or 
below normal precipitation and above normal temperatures over the 
state for the next three months. This neutral pattern is expected to 
impact the southeast into the summer.

SPRING FLOOD OUTLOOK.
Considering the rainfall expected for the next three months, and the 
pre-existing dry to near normal soil conditions, the outlook is for 
a below normal chance of flooding this spring in north and central 
Georgia. 

&&

RELATED WEBSITES...

For detailed web information concerning river stages and forecasts 
for north and central Georgia, please see the following websites.

NWS WFO Atlanta:  www.weather.gov/atlanta 
Southeast River Forecast Center: www.weather.gov/serfc
NWS WFO Atlanta - Lake Levels: weather.gov/ffc/rrm 
NOAA AHPS - Rainfall Totals: water.weather.gov/precip 
U.S. Drought Portal: www.drought.gov U.S. 
Drought Monitor: www.droughtmonitor.unl.edu 
Climate Prediction Center: www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov 
U.S. Geological Survey - Water Resources of GA: ga.water.usgs.gov 

QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS...

If you have any questions or comments about this Spring Flood 
Outlook, please contact:

NWS WFO Atlanta
4 Falcon Drive Peachtree City, GA 30269
Phone: 770-486-1133
Email: sr-ffc.webmaster@noaa.gov

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Belanger

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